Production:

There is a limited amount of barley produced in Israel, but it is all harvested as silage; all barley grain is imported. Most barley production is located in the south of Israel and the rest is in Beit-Sh'ean Valley (eastern Israel).

About 4,500 HA of barley for silage are grown in Israel and production is about 10 MT per HA, totaling about 38,000 MT.

Consumption:

Barley is the third biggest feed grain in Israel after corn and feed, with a consumption that is likely to range between 190-550 TMT in the coming years. Most of it is sold to the Arab population (both in Israel and the Palestinian Authority) as feed for their livestock, mainly sheep.

Trade:

MY 2015/16 Outlook

The price of the four main feed grains (corn, feed wheat, barley and sorghum) determines Israeli's feed milling industry's choice. Since expanded corn imports are expected and restricted feed wheat supplies are projected to continue in MY 2015/16, the feed industry's demand for barley imports is expected to increase compared to the previous year and will total about 340 TMT, a 6 percent up.

Due to the presence of the xanthophyll 1 pigmentation in corn that has an effect of turning the broiler meat yellow, Israeli feed millers must use in the feed mix other grains, so if feed wheat import are decreasing then barley/sorghum imports must go up. Israeli consumers refuse to buy yellow chicken meat, since they relate the color to poor health and obesity. Therefore, sorghum/barley are needed as a substitute for feed wheat.

In recent years annual barley imports were not less than 190 TMT and not more than 550 TMT per year and barley imports are projected to stay at these levels in the coming years.

MY 2014/15 Outlook

Although there were restricted feed wheat supplies from Ukraine in MY 2013/14 and MY 2014/15, barley imports experienced an increase of about 8 percent compared to the previous year, totaling 325 TMT, mainly due to the significant increase in corn imports. As described above, in order to not have a yellow poultry/turkey, therefore barley/sorghum imports must rise if feed wheat imports are decreasing and corn imports are increasing.

There have been no imports of barley from the U.S. in recent years, and this situation is not expected to change in the future, as most barley is imported from Ukraine.

Stocks:

Emergency feedstuff stocks including all feed grains, DDGS, corn gluten feed and oil meals stand at about 120,000 tons per year. Out of this amount, about 25,000 tons are barley.

Barley

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

Market Begin Year

Oct 2013

Oct 2014

Oct 2015

Israel

USDA Official

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USDA Official

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USDA Official

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Area Harvested

0

0

0

0

0

0

Beginning Stocks

12

22

27

25

0

35

Production

0

0

0

0

0

0

MY Imports

275

380

300

325

0

340

TY Imports

275

380

300

325

0

340

TY Imp. from U.S.

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Supply

287

402

327

350

0

375

MY Exports

0

0

0

0

0

0

TY Exports

0

0

0

0

0

0

Feed and Residual

250

367

275

305

0

330

FSI Consumption

10

10

10

10

0

11

Total Consumption

260

377

285

315

0

341

Ending Stocks

27

25

42

35

0

34

Total Distribution

287

402

327

350

0

375

1000 HA, 1000 MT, MT/HA