Oilseed, Peanut

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

Market Begin Year

Oct 2013

Oct 2014

Oct 2015

European Union

USDA Official

New post

USDA Official

New post

USDA Official

New post

Area Planted

0

0

0

0

0

0

Beginning Stocks

31

31

18

25

0

25

Production

0

0

0

0

0

0

MY Imports

745

786

750

810

0

820

MY Imp. from U.S.

191

202

190

220

0

230

Total Supply

776

817

768

835

0

845

MY Exports

24

25

24

30

0

30

Crush

32

35

32

35

0

35

Food Use Dom. Cons.

699

729

701

742

0

752

Feed Waste Dom. Cons.

3

3

3

3

0

3

Total Dom. Cons.

734

767

736

780

0

790

Ending Stocks

18

25

8

25

0

25

Total Distribution

776

817

768

835

0

845

1000 HA, 1000 MT

The European Union is the largest importer of peanut and peanut products in the world. Trade in ready-shelled peanuts is increasing at the expense of in-shell (the latter now comprises only 10 percent of total tonnage). Competition among exporting nations has diverged in recent years: China and the U.S. lead exports of in-shell to the EU, while Argentina dominates the shelled peanut trade. In the last two marketing years the U.S. took ten percentage market share points from Argentina in shelled trade. On the back of the U.S. record harvest in 2012 and ample supply through to MY 2014/2015, imports are estimated to increase slightly from the United States over the previous marketing year. The majority of shelled peanuts are supplied by Argentina (50-60 percent), and ultimately directed to the EU confectionery market. Argentina is also predicted to continue to have adequate supply for export, and therefore total EU distribution is expected to increase. Other suppliers include China, the U.S. and increasingly Brazil. In general, U.S. shelled peanut trade with the EU is price-driven, but trade is also dependent on the ease with which U.S. suppliers can meet EU requirements for pesticide residues, aflatoxin levels, phytosanitary certificates and private industry standards. After years of consolidation, the EU peanut kernel market is dominated by very few large multi-national processors.

Peanut Meal

Meal, Peanut

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

Market Begin Year

Oct 2013

Oct 2014

Oct 2015

European Union

USDA Official

New post

USDA Official

New post

USDA Official

New post

Crush

32

35

32

35

0

35

Beginning Stocks

0

0

0

0

0

0

Production

14

16

14

16

0

16

MY Imports

11

11

10

8

0

10

MY Imp. from U.S.

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Supply

25

27

24

24

0

26

MY Exports

0

0

0

0

0

0

Industrial Dom. Cons.

0

0

0

0

0

0

Food Use Dom. Cons.

0

0

0

0

0

0

Feed Waste Dom. Cons.

25

27

24

24

0

26

Total Dom. Cons.

25

27

24

24

0

26

Ending Stocks

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Distribution

25

27

24

24

0

26

1000 MT

Peanuts for confectionery and other further processed product uses remains the focal point for trade. Peanut crushing within the EU has not increased in recent times. The main supplier to the EU of Peanut Meal is Senegal. Exports from West Africa are erratic and intrinsically linked to political levers, as well as extreme weather events. Reports from FAS/USDA in Senegal indicate that there is likely to be a lack of quality seeds going into 2015 production. This, coupled with unclear support for Senegalese farmers, results in an estimated slight decrease in Peanut Meal imports to the EU in the current marketing year.

Peanut Oil

Oil, Peanut

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

Market Begin Year

Oct 2013

Oct 2014

Oct 2015

European Union

USDA Official

New post

USDA Official

New post

USDA Official

New post

Crush

32

35

32

35

0

35

Beginning Stocks

2

2

3

3

0

4

Production

12

13

12

13

0

13

MY Imports

66

66

66

63

0

60

MY Imp. from U.S.

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Supply

80

81

81

79

0

77

MY Exports

3

3

3

3

0

0

Industrial Dom. Cons.

0

0

0

0

0

0

Food Use Dom. Cons.

74

75

74

72

0

73

Feed Waste Dom. Cons.

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Dom. Cons.

74

75

74

72

0

73

Ending Stocks

3

3

4

4

0

4

Total Distribution

80

81

81

79

0

77

1000 MT

Although it undergoes further refinement after crushing, peanut oil must be labelled on EU food packaging as an allergen. This deters its widespread use in food applications. EU peanut oil consumption has declined in the last 8 years, and is increasingly substituted by other oils (such as sunflower and sesame oil) in Europe. Before 2012, Senegal was the largest supplier of peanut oil to the EU. Brazil has now taken top spot and is showing consistent levels of trade in peanut oil with the EU. This is also the case, to a lesser extent with Argentina and Nicaragua. However, since January 2014, Argentina and Brazil are no longer eligible for preferential access when trading with the EU. This new tariff scenario could bring increasing attention and opportunities to Central American and African countries, which already play an important role in supply of peanut oil. For example, calendar year 2014 imports from Senegal were 15,000 MT, versus 5,000 MT in 2013.